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of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him mention stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. it's an iconic speech. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the equality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come into the fold. here the president of the united states
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
the alabama civil civil rights march. >> this is for all americans. to get out and enjoy this day and to celebrate and remember the struggles that we all have been through. [ singing ] >> reporter: hundreds of people join said them for a mile and a half march to the gardens. >> celebrating dr. king and celebrating community. that is important. >> reporter: more than a thousand people attended prayer services services and presentations on the life of dr. king. she knew and marched with dr. king. >> very, very nice. he was a wonderful person. wonderful person. non-violent. turning of the cheek. >> reporter: she was one of many african americans turned away that voting both. joining a dangerous protest march. she marched with dr. king on the civil rights march. >> very, very scary and a memorable experience that just doesn't go away. >> reporter: many people said a lot changed but more needs to change. reporting live in san francisco, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 49er head coach jim harbaugh had a lot to say today, we will let you hear what he is not looking forward to when he
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
. and they paused before this bust of the civil rights leader. the president said this was the first time he'd noticed the king bust among artifacts there and said it was a privilege to use the bible of the civil rights leader in his swearing in ceremony. >> the 24th annual martin luther king junior paradex÷(f held this morning this, is the oldest tribute to king in the east bay. the parade ended with a rally. >> people in san jose honored the late civil rights leader by hopping aboard the annual freedom train. this train ended in san francisco, coming up at 4:55 we'll have a report on other events around san francisco honoring dr. king. >> check out this video shot hours ago by sky 7 hd. that is a surfer near the cliff house. >> strong rip currents caused the surfer to lose his bearings. the coast guard first thought of air lifting him but then decided on a different approach. they told the surfer to jump into the water and jim against crashing waves to rescuers. >> shouldn't have been as far as i was with my buddy. he was a more advanced surfer. called whoever needed to call, and they ca
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
makes history in his second inaugural address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate mac
and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent man, correct? >> he yes, very much so. he has to know the track is he on is going to cause irreparable har
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
and vice president paid tribute to dr. king a second time, pausing at a bust of the slain civil rights leader in the rotunda. during the procession down pennsylvania avenue, the president and first lady walked part of the way and later took their place in the reviewing stand as the inaugural parade began. ♪ >> reporter: and the party continued into the night. ♪ he's president and he's on fire ♪ >> reporter: michelle obama wowed the audiences at two inaugural balls in a ruby chiffon and velvet gown by jason wu. but the celebration was not as grand as 2009 which saw the president and first lady attend ten balls. >> now that the parties are over the work on president obama's second term begins. susan mcginnis with more on that. good morning. >> reporter: anne-marie, good morning. yes, item number one is the debt limit. we learned on monday that the house will vote tomorrow on raising the debt ceiling for a period of three months, and the republicans have made a big concession. they had their dance and took a moment to savor the scene. now it's time to get ba
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
gave, the civil rights speech of a generation that people look at that speech as, it will be interesting to see what comes next. great to see you. safe travels back today. thanks for being here. >>> all of us, as vital as the one light we move through, the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day, equations to solve, history to question or atoms imagined. the i have a dream we all keep dreaming. or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won't explain the empty desks of 20 children marked absent today and forever. >> it was a stirring, intimate and modern tribute to america in verse both uplifting and heartbreaking and historic in its own right. joining me is the man who wrote the poem exclusively, richard blanco, inaugural poet. correct myth from legend here. we understand there were three poems that you had penned for this and the white house picked this one. however, it wasn't your favorite. so explain the other two poems and why one was top on the list as opposed to this one. >> well, i think it was part of the challenge of writing the occasional po
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
father's about world war ii or the depression or vietnam or civil rights movement, or perhaps if your parents or grandparents came from another country and settled here what it's like. only five to ten percent of the ands come up. if i asked that same question in afghanistan or pakistan or africa 90% of ands come up and i think the as great tragedy we've lost that oral tradition and a rich tradition about folklore and heritage and faith and heritage. to honor that today i'd like to share with you a little story. it's a hard cover book that came out in march of 2006. anybody have a hard cover. wave it up here. you might not want it after i say this. i got to pick the title. three cups of tea but viking told me they would pick the subtitle and they picked one man mission to fight terrorism one school at a time. i objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a t
campaigners before it had even started. demonstrators against the bill say are just fighting for civil rights. >> i am liberal. i am for freedom for all. for gay people and other minorities, too. >> this is not about sex in public, but a quick kiss or holding someone's hand -- that's just normal. >> the bill has two more readings. it then goes to the upper house, and president putin for approval. if passed, it could lead to fines for what it calls homosexual propaganda. supporters say the aim is to protect russian children. >> i am going to vote in favor of the bill. god created people of different sexes so that we do not get up to such nonsense. and many russians share his view, but critics of the bill say it will only worsen hostilities that gay people face. gay rights campaigners were attacked earlier this week as they protested against the bill. >> the majority of the russian population is more conservative and rejects homosexuality. critics say the new law would be another step on the path away from freedom and democracy. m a german business confidence has risen to a seven-month high, be
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
of civil rights, selma, and stonewall, manhattan bossuet's the village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happened in congress this week that may have an impact -- will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell reaching an agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact president? >> what the house did it is illustrative of what will be ahead of us. they have not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling, this budget crisis. they have no leverage over the president. they discover they have no leverage. now they have to find a way to back down. this is their face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. you will see more of this. the president is in a much stronger position of dealing with the congress and house republicans. >> you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion. but i dissent, the president, like any other, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant central dramatic figure, w
riots in new york city which launched the gay rights movement and linked them to other civil rights struggles. and now that the work is over as you saw a few minutes ago it is party time. coming up we'll get back and give you another insider's look at some of the festivities and preparations to make it happen. >>> the first time in 18 years the 49ers are back in the super bowl. if you were around here in the mid-'90s and 1980s, you know how wild the bay area gets with 49ers fever. this time something totally new for the 49ers and the nfl. you probably know by now, sibling rivalry, two brothers coaching against each other in the super bowl. we have extensive coverage tonight of the super bowl. jim kozemore in our newsroom. we begin with arturo santiago with the family angle. >> reporter: you could say john harbaugh has had bragging rights since they beat the 49ers on thanksgiving day in 2011. now that very same sibling rivalry will be played out on an even bigger stage, the super bowl. >> i feel like there's no losing in that family. and i'm sure the brothers feel the same way. but o
survive half slave and half free. >> casting himself in the mold of the great civil rights leader, vowed action on a series of issues from climate change to immigration reform and became the first president to use the word "gay" in the address. >> our gurn noi are not complete until wives, daughters, can earn a wage equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brother and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> he offered a bigger defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit, but we reject the belief america has to choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started it with a prayer service at st. johns church before departing the white house for one of the longest motorcades known to man for the ride to the capitol. ♪ oh beautiful >> a star-studded affair where else will paul ryan mingle with beyonce who belted out the national anthem. when the
about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: as the president made his exit, a pause turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> reporter: they look like so many american families do when they take in a parade. and we learned the family of the late dr. martin luther king asked the president and the chief justice sign the king family bible after the swearing in. and they did. david muir, abc news, washington. >> incredible moment when he looks back. what a scene that must be. almost a million people out there. >> i would want to take a second look as well. i want to look at you. let me get your better side. all right, okay. >>> so the inaugural observances aren't over, even at this late hour. >> our coverage continues now with abc's brandi hitt live in washington. brandi, after some glitzy galas, there are more events set for later today. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, rob. good morning, paula. that's right, the
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
rights. take for example the civil war when men fled behind so-called enemy lines to the north, they inserted their humanity with the demand they be allowed to join the union army and fight against the confederacy. and black soldiers in world war i came home to find themselves the targets of lynchings and beatings. why? because they were wearing their uniforms in public. but it was the very fact of their service that w.e.b. du bois believed bound them to the citizenship. but with those citizens at home, w.e.b. du bois wrote, this is the country to which we soldiers of democracy return and this is the fatherland for which we fought, but it is our fatherland. it was right for us to fight. the faults of our country are our faults. make way for democracy, and we saved it in france, and by the great jehovah, we will save nit the united states of america or know the reason why. but it wasn't until world war ii that du bois's imperative would become fully realized, because afric african-american like the tuskegee airmen and the first african-american nurses who j n joined the black n
in your "usa today" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil libert
groups and civil rights groups and some scholars is that we put together this omnibus road to electoral reform bill. it's 199 pages long. it has over 50 important changes, and you named some of them all right. and what we're doing is saying as far as we've come already voting still has a little bit more perfection. we can make it better, make it easier, make it friendly to the voters. that's what some people in politics don't want to do, but that's what those of us that are 160 in number, including senator kirsten gillibrand in new york just introduced, and we'll have our work cut out for us to make the election fair and easier for the american citizen. >> john: is this designed to help democratic voters or do both parties try to play dirty tricks with each other's voters? have democrats tried to suppress republican votes as well? >> we're not angels on the democratic side, but i cannot name you one instance to document that. i don't know about it. and look, all republicans are not all bad guys. a lot of these things are being done by their political organizations by a few elected offic
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
. >>> the controversial plan to limit the size of sugary drinks has hit an unexpected new roadblock. two mayor civil right groups have gone to stop it. jeff glor, good morning. >> good morning to you. not many were surprised to see them oppose it but some were surprised when the spanish deck calculation and the naacp. they said they're doing it not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan would but a limit to 16-understand drink in restaurants, sports games, street carts, and movie theaters. it results in $4.7 billion in annual health care costs. 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkers struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometime decided that an issue that is important to him should be just a this way or no hazel dukes is the presid. >> the decision is -- >> people can say what they want to. we are on the side of fairness. >> the lawsuit contents the su
is obviously history. >> there is a strong theme of civil rights. >> america's possibilities are limitless. it is now our generation's task to carry on. >> this speech was about an action plan. >> we cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or treat name-calling as debate. we must act. >> things will get back to what we see as normal. >> today is a day to celebrate the democracy. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment. and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. >> for the first time in recent history, today a giant event in washington ran a few minutes early. and ten minutes before noon, chief justice john roberts administered the oath of office to the president, and he delivered the second inaugural address which lasted just over 18 minutes. >> for our journeys are not complete until our wives and mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal, as we
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